Bromeliaceae

Scientific Name - Tillandsia x floridana Common Name - NonePlace of Origin - FloridaStatus - Not known
This is a new acquisition, and one of the biggest tillandsia’s I own. Florida has 18 native bromeliads, 12 of them are tillandsia species, 3 of them are catopis species, 1 of them is a guzmania species, and the remaining 2 are natural tillandsia hybrids, T. x floridana is one of them. 
Tillandsia x floridana is thought to be a hybrid between T. bartramii and T. fasciculata var. densipica, and strongly resembles its Tillandsia bartramii parent. It appears to be extremely variable, with plants ranging anywhere from 7 to 24 inches in height. 
My plant is around 24 inches tall, including the inflorescence, and about 6 inches wide. It has the typical, purple, tubular flowers like many other tillandsia’s and flowers from spring to summer. Plants can be grown from full sun to full shade, should be mounted or put in a basket, and given plenty of air flow. I water mine every other day or so and have it gets sun for maybe half the day.  Scientific Name - Tillandsia x floridana Common Name - NonePlace of Origin - FloridaStatus - Not known
This is a new acquisition, and one of the biggest tillandsia’s I own. Florida has 18 native bromeliads, 12 of them are tillandsia species, 3 of them are catopis species, 1 of them is a guzmania species, and the remaining 2 are natural tillandsia hybrids, T. x floridana is one of them. 
Tillandsia x floridana is thought to be a hybrid between T. bartramii and T. fasciculata var. densipica, and strongly resembles its Tillandsia bartramii parent. It appears to be extremely variable, with plants ranging anywhere from 7 to 24 inches in height. 
My plant is around 24 inches tall, including the inflorescence, and about 6 inches wide. It has the typical, purple, tubular flowers like many other tillandsia’s and flowers from spring to summer. Plants can be grown from full sun to full shade, should be mounted or put in a basket, and given plenty of air flow. I water mine every other day or so and have it gets sun for maybe half the day.  Scientific Name - Tillandsia x floridana Common Name - NonePlace of Origin - FloridaStatus - Not known
This is a new acquisition, and one of the biggest tillandsia’s I own. Florida has 18 native bromeliads, 12 of them are tillandsia species, 3 of them are catopis species, 1 of them is a guzmania species, and the remaining 2 are natural tillandsia hybrids, T. x floridana is one of them. 
Tillandsia x floridana is thought to be a hybrid between T. bartramii and T. fasciculata var. densipica, and strongly resembles its Tillandsia bartramii parent. It appears to be extremely variable, with plants ranging anywhere from 7 to 24 inches in height. 
My plant is around 24 inches tall, including the inflorescence, and about 6 inches wide. It has the typical, purple, tubular flowers like many other tillandsia’s and flowers from spring to summer. Plants can be grown from full sun to full shade, should be mounted or put in a basket, and given plenty of air flow. I water mine every other day or so and have it gets sun for maybe half the day.  Scientific Name - Tillandsia x floridana Common Name - NonePlace of Origin - FloridaStatus - Not known
This is a new acquisition, and one of the biggest tillandsia’s I own. Florida has 18 native bromeliads, 12 of them are tillandsia species, 3 of them are catopis species, 1 of them is a guzmania species, and the remaining 2 are natural tillandsia hybrids, T. x floridana is one of them. 
Tillandsia x floridana is thought to be a hybrid between T. bartramii and T. fasciculata var. densipica, and strongly resembles its Tillandsia bartramii parent. It appears to be extremely variable, with plants ranging anywhere from 7 to 24 inches in height. 
My plant is around 24 inches tall, including the inflorescence, and about 6 inches wide. It has the typical, purple, tubular flowers like many other tillandsia’s and flowers from spring to summer. Plants can be grown from full sun to full shade, should be mounted or put in a basket, and given plenty of air flow. I water mine every other day or so and have it gets sun for maybe half the day.  Scientific Name - Tillandsia x floridana Common Name - NonePlace of Origin - FloridaStatus - Not known
This is a new acquisition, and one of the biggest tillandsia’s I own. Florida has 18 native bromeliads, 12 of them are tillandsia species, 3 of them are catopis species, 1 of them is a guzmania species, and the remaining 2 are natural tillandsia hybrids, T. x floridana is one of them. 
Tillandsia x floridana is thought to be a hybrid between T. bartramii and T. fasciculata var. densipica, and strongly resembles its Tillandsia bartramii parent. It appears to be extremely variable, with plants ranging anywhere from 7 to 24 inches in height. 
My plant is around 24 inches tall, including the inflorescence, and about 6 inches wide. It has the typical, purple, tubular flowers like many other tillandsia’s and flowers from spring to summer. Plants can be grown from full sun to full shade, should be mounted or put in a basket, and given plenty of air flow. I water mine every other day or so and have it gets sun for maybe half the day.  

Scientific Name - Tillandsia x floridana 
Common Name - None
Place of Origin - Florida
Status - Not known

This is a new acquisition, and one of the biggest tillandsia’s I own. Florida has 18 native bromeliads, 12 of them are tillandsia species, 3 of them are catopis species, 1 of them is a guzmania species, and the remaining 2 are natural tillandsia hybrids, T. x floridana is one of them. 

Tillandsia x floridana is thought to be a hybrid between T. bartramii and T. fasciculata var. densipica, and strongly resembles its Tillandsia bartramii parent. It appears to be extremely variable, with plants ranging anywhere from 7 to 24 inches in height. 

My plant is around 24 inches tall, including the inflorescence, and about 6 inches wide. It has the typical, purple, tubular flowers like many other tillandsia’s and flowers from spring to summer. Plants can be grown from full sun to full shade, should be mounted or put in a basket, and given plenty of air flow. I water mine every other day or so and have it gets sun for maybe half the day.  


These are just some of the fruits I collected the other day, all of them are somewhat related.
I only collected 2 fruits from myAechmea distichantha, one of them I assume is self pollinated, and the other one is one I crossed withAechmea’Red Dragon’. I’m not sure how those plants will turn out, but it should be interesting to see what they look like.
ThexQuesmea’Lyman fruits came from 2 different plants. I was surprised when I got the seeds out of them though, because some of the fruits put out 20 or more seeds, while others put out 2 or 3.
All the plants in the bromelioideae subfamily produce fleshy fruits like these. You can tell when the fruits are ripe because they will change color. For instance, all of these fruits changed to a purple color, while the unpollinated fruits are still pink.These are just some of the fruits I collected the other day, all of them are somewhat related.
I only collected 2 fruits from myAechmea distichantha, one of them I assume is self pollinated, and the other one is one I crossed withAechmea’Red Dragon’. I’m not sure how those plants will turn out, but it should be interesting to see what they look like.
ThexQuesmea’Lyman fruits came from 2 different plants. I was surprised when I got the seeds out of them though, because some of the fruits put out 20 or more seeds, while others put out 2 or 3.
All the plants in the bromelioideae subfamily produce fleshy fruits like these. You can tell when the fruits are ripe because they will change color. For instance, all of these fruits changed to a purple color, while the unpollinated fruits are still pink.These are just some of the fruits I collected the other day, all of them are somewhat related.
I only collected 2 fruits from myAechmea distichantha, one of them I assume is self pollinated, and the other one is one I crossed withAechmea’Red Dragon’. I’m not sure how those plants will turn out, but it should be interesting to see what they look like.
ThexQuesmea’Lyman fruits came from 2 different plants. I was surprised when I got the seeds out of them though, because some of the fruits put out 20 or more seeds, while others put out 2 or 3.
All the plants in the bromelioideae subfamily produce fleshy fruits like these. You can tell when the fruits are ripe because they will change color. For instance, all of these fruits changed to a purple color, while the unpollinated fruits are still pink.

These are just some of the fruits I collected the other day, all of them are somewhat related.

I only collected 2 fruits from myAechmea distichantha, one of them I assume is self pollinated, and the other one is one I crossed withAechmea’Red Dragon’. I’m not sure how those plants will turn out, but it should be interesting to see what they look like.

ThexQuesmea’Lyman fruits came from 2 different plants. I was surprised when I got the seeds out of them though, because some of the fruits put out 20 or more seeds, while others put out 2 or 3.

All the plants in the bromelioideae subfamily produce fleshy fruits like these. You can tell when the fruits are ripe because they will change color. For instance, all of these fruits changed to a purple color, while the unpollinated fruits are still pink.