Bromeliaceae

Okay i got a ceramic pot, but it turned out to be smaller. lol
but now when i take a look at the roots i think it might need a pot one size bigger than its current one? and thanks again :)

Honestly, the smaller pot should be fine, but you’re probably going to have a hard time getting it into that pot! And it looks like it would still be too top heavy for it. 
I wouldn’t get a pot too much larger than it’s current one, since they don’t need large pots, but you could get a slightly larger one for sure. 
Just make sure the mix drains fast and that it doesn’t sit in water and your plant should be fine! View Larger

Okay i got a ceramic pot, but it turned out to be smaller. lol

but now when i take a look at the roots i think it might need a pot one size bigger than its current one? and thanks again :)

Honestly, the smaller pot should be fine, but you’re probably going to have a hard time getting it into that pot! And it looks like it would still be too top heavy for it. 

I wouldn’t get a pot too much larger than it’s current one, since they don’t need large pots, but you could get a slightly larger one for sure. 

Just make sure the mix drains fast and that it doesn’t sit in water and your plant should be fine!


hey! i have a few questions..first of all: i’ve had this bromeliad for a month now, and when i got it the leaves of the blossom were really sharp and strong, but the past few days (10? maybe) they’re weak and i can touch them :D …is it time to cut it? or should i leave it until its all dried out… second: should i remove that little offshoot? because in my opinion it would look cute when it grows, but i’d also like to have two seperate pots of bromeliads :D third: should i cut that wilted leaf, or just let it be until it dies completely…i guess if i decide to remove the offshoot i would remove the leaf anyway, but still.. i want your advice and opinion :) and last: should i transfer it to a larger pot? i mean i’m going to transfer it to another pot anyway, because this one is too light, but should i get a larger one, or this size is fine? thanks in advance :)) 

Thanks for your submission and your questions!
This is Aechmea fasciata, the flower spike will last for quite some time and keep its color for months, so there’s no need to remove it yet. 
You should definitely leave the little offset attached to the mother plant until it’s at least half the size of the mother plant. If you remove it now it will not survive. The majority of bromeliads die after they flower, but they produce pups so they live on through them. As with your plant, the mother plant that is flowering right now will eventually die (which will take at least a year to do), but as you can see it’s producing at least one pup and will probably make more, so don’t worry!
You can definitely remove the yellowing leaf if you’d like, just be careful not to break off the offset, I’ve done that many times and it’s sad haha
As for pot size that’s actually a good size for the plant. In nature, the majority of bromeliads only use their roots to anchor to trees, rocks, or other supports. When we pot them up like this, they still only use their roots for anchorage, so they don’t need giant pots. They do well in small pots with a fast draining mix (such as a prepackaged orchid potting mix). I put most of mine in clay pots because they are a little bit heavier and prevent the top heavy plants from falling over! So you could buy a heavier pot for it and keep it in the plastic pot and it will do just fine.  View Larger

hey! i have a few questions..first of all: i’ve had this bromeliad for a month now, and when i got it the leaves of the blossom were really sharp and strong, but the past few days (10? maybe) they’re weak and i can touch them :D …is it time to cut it? or should i leave it until its all dried out… second: should i remove that little offshoot? because in my opinion it would look cute when it grows, but i’d also like to have two seperate pots of bromeliads :D third: should i cut that wilted leaf, or just let it be until it dies completely…i guess if i decide to remove the offshoot i would remove the leaf anyway, but still.. i want your advice and opinion :) and last: should i transfer it to a larger pot? i mean i’m going to transfer it to another pot anyway, because this one is too light, but should i get a larger one, or this size is fine? thanks in advance :)) 

Thanks for your submission and your questions!

This is Aechmea fasciata, the flower spike will last for quite some time and keep its color for months, so there’s no need to remove it yet. 

You should definitely leave the little offset attached to the mother plant until it’s at least half the size of the mother plant. If you remove it now it will not survive. The majority of bromeliads die after they flower, but they produce pups so they live on through them. As with your plant, the mother plant that is flowering right now will eventually die (which will take at least a year to do), but as you can see it’s producing at least one pup and will probably make more, so don’t worry!

You can definitely remove the yellowing leaf if you’d like, just be careful not to break off the offset, I’ve done that many times and it’s sad haha

As for pot size that’s actually a good size for the plant. In nature, the majority of bromeliads only use their roots to anchor to trees, rocks, or other supports. When we pot them up like this, they still only use their roots for anchorage, so they don’t need giant pots. They do well in small pots with a fast draining mix (such as a prepackaged orchid potting mix). I put most of mine in clay pots because they are a little bit heavier and prevent the top heavy plants from falling over! So you could buy a heavier pot for it and keep it in the plastic pot and it will do just fine. 


randomc:

Aechmea ‘Bert’
A true epiphyte with gorgeous patterns and a need to climb!
This is my biggest mounted specimen and also my favorite one as well. It’s a monster and is so heavy!
Each plant is close to two feet tall, probably larger, and they hold a ton of water. The leaves are also heavily armed like most aechmeas, but how can you say no to a plant like this?
Goes in the greenhouse every winter and in full sun during the rest of the year! It’s best to grow it mounted due to its stoloniferous habit.

This is such a great plant. 
It will get some nice color later in the summer! View Larger

randomc:

Aechmea ‘Bert’

A true epiphyte with gorgeous patterns and a need to climb!

This is my biggest mounted specimen and also my favorite one as well. It’s a monster and is so heavy!

Each plant is close to two feet tall, probably larger, and they hold a ton of water. The leaves are also heavily armed like most aechmeas, but how can you say no to a plant like this?

Goes in the greenhouse every winter and in full sun during the rest of the year! It’s best to grow it mounted due to its stoloniferous habit.

This is such a great plant. 

It will get some nice color later in the summer!


Did you know you can use ground cinnamon to help prevent your bromeliads from rotting?

If you suspect your plants are starting to rot, either from the base or from the center you can sprinkle it in the center and the leaf axils, and you may be able to save your plant!

Let it sit in your plant for a few days while you let your plant dry and there’s a good chance you’ll save your plant from rotting competely! And it should give you some pups in time.Did you know you can use ground cinnamon to help prevent your bromeliads from rotting?

If you suspect your plants are starting to rot, either from the base or from the center you can sprinkle it in the center and the leaf axils, and you may be able to save your plant!

Let it sit in your plant for a few days while you let your plant dry and there’s a good chance you’ll save your plant from rotting competely! And it should give you some pups in time.Did you know you can use ground cinnamon to help prevent your bromeliads from rotting?

If you suspect your plants are starting to rot, either from the base or from the center you can sprinkle it in the center and the leaf axils, and you may be able to save your plant!

Let it sit in your plant for a few days while you let your plant dry and there’s a good chance you’ll save your plant from rotting competely! And it should give you some pups in time.

Did you know you can use ground cinnamon to help prevent your bromeliads from rotting?

If you suspect your plants are starting to rot, either from the base or from the center you can sprinkle it in the center and the leaf axils, and you may be able to save your plant!

Let it sit in your plant for a few days while you let your plant dry and there’s a good chance you’ll save your plant from rotting competely! And it should give you some pups in time.