Bromeliaceae

Scientific Name - Nidularium procerum Common Name - None KnownPlace of Origin - BrazilStatus - Unknown
Nidularium is a great genus of plants, closely related to the neoregelia genus. Unlike neoregelia’s, most nidularium’s have inflorescence’s that extend above the cup of the plant, and all are start shaped. Many nidularium’s can also tolerate cold weather, making them great plants for temperate gardens.
Nidularium procerum was my first nidularium, and has been in my garden for at least 2 winters. Individual plants mature at around 18 inches tall; they have finely toothed leaves that are red at the base and green towards the tips. Pups from close the the mother plant and dense clumps are formed relatively quickly. 
Most nidularium’s need to grow in shade, and most also like more moisture than other bromeliads, but they can also handle some dry conditions. Scientific Name - Nidularium procerum Common Name - None KnownPlace of Origin - BrazilStatus - Unknown
Nidularium is a great genus of plants, closely related to the neoregelia genus. Unlike neoregelia’s, most nidularium’s have inflorescence’s that extend above the cup of the plant, and all are start shaped. Many nidularium’s can also tolerate cold weather, making them great plants for temperate gardens.
Nidularium procerum was my first nidularium, and has been in my garden for at least 2 winters. Individual plants mature at around 18 inches tall; they have finely toothed leaves that are red at the base and green towards the tips. Pups from close the the mother plant and dense clumps are formed relatively quickly. 
Most nidularium’s need to grow in shade, and most also like more moisture than other bromeliads, but they can also handle some dry conditions. Scientific Name - Nidularium procerum Common Name - None KnownPlace of Origin - BrazilStatus - Unknown
Nidularium is a great genus of plants, closely related to the neoregelia genus. Unlike neoregelia’s, most nidularium’s have inflorescence’s that extend above the cup of the plant, and all are start shaped. Many nidularium’s can also tolerate cold weather, making them great plants for temperate gardens.
Nidularium procerum was my first nidularium, and has been in my garden for at least 2 winters. Individual plants mature at around 18 inches tall; they have finely toothed leaves that are red at the base and green towards the tips. Pups from close the the mother plant and dense clumps are formed relatively quickly. 
Most nidularium’s need to grow in shade, and most also like more moisture than other bromeliads, but they can also handle some dry conditions. 

Scientific Name - Nidularium procerum 
Common Name - None Known
Place of Origin - Brazil
Status - Unknown

Nidularium is a great genus of plants, closely related to the neoregelia genus. Unlike neoregelia’s, most nidularium’s have inflorescence’s that extend above the cup of the plant, and all are start shaped. Many nidularium’s can also tolerate cold weather, making them great plants for temperate gardens.

Nidularium procerum was my first nidularium, and has been in my garden for at least 2 winters. Individual plants mature at around 18 inches tall; they have finely toothed leaves that are red at the base and green towards the tips. Pups from close the the mother plant and dense clumps are formed relatively quickly. 

Most nidularium’s need to grow in shade, and most also like more moisture than other bromeliads, but they can also handle some dry conditions.