Bromeliaceae

Did you know you can use ground cinnamon to help prevent your bromeliads from rotting?

If you suspect your plants are starting to rot, either from the base or from the center you can sprinkle it in the center and the leaf axils, and you may be able to save your plant!

Let it sit in your plant for a few days while you let your plant dry and there’s a good chance you’ll save your plant from rotting competely! And it should give you some pups in time.Did you know you can use ground cinnamon to help prevent your bromeliads from rotting?

If you suspect your plants are starting to rot, either from the base or from the center you can sprinkle it in the center and the leaf axils, and you may be able to save your plant!

Let it sit in your plant for a few days while you let your plant dry and there’s a good chance you’ll save your plant from rotting competely! And it should give you some pups in time.Did you know you can use ground cinnamon to help prevent your bromeliads from rotting?

If you suspect your plants are starting to rot, either from the base or from the center you can sprinkle it in the center and the leaf axils, and you may be able to save your plant!

Let it sit in your plant for a few days while you let your plant dry and there’s a good chance you’ll save your plant from rotting competely! And it should give you some pups in time.

Did you know you can use ground cinnamon to help prevent your bromeliads from rotting?

If you suspect your plants are starting to rot, either from the base or from the center you can sprinkle it in the center and the leaf axils, and you may be able to save your plant!

Let it sit in your plant for a few days while you let your plant dry and there’s a good chance you’ll save your plant from rotting competely! And it should give you some pups in time.


Potted this little Dyckia ‘Naked Lady’ F2 into a rather large container this morning. It’s called ‘Naked Lady’ because it doesn’t have any spines along it’s leaf edges, which is uncommon for dyckia. 

This dyckia grows to be about one foot tall and wide so it should look nice once it matures. I also left this little native ground cover with it, in hopes that it will grow and spill out over the sides of the container and grow along the rock. 

Hope it makes it through the winter cause it’s not getting moved from that spot for years.Potted this little Dyckia ‘Naked Lady’ F2 into a rather large container this morning. It’s called ‘Naked Lady’ because it doesn’t have any spines along it’s leaf edges, which is uncommon for dyckia. 

This dyckia grows to be about one foot tall and wide so it should look nice once it matures. I also left this little native ground cover with it, in hopes that it will grow and spill out over the sides of the container and grow along the rock. 

Hope it makes it through the winter cause it’s not getting moved from that spot for years.Potted this little Dyckia ‘Naked Lady’ F2 into a rather large container this morning. It’s called ‘Naked Lady’ because it doesn’t have any spines along it’s leaf edges, which is uncommon for dyckia. 

This dyckia grows to be about one foot tall and wide so it should look nice once it matures. I also left this little native ground cover with it, in hopes that it will grow and spill out over the sides of the container and grow along the rock. 

Hope it makes it through the winter cause it’s not getting moved from that spot for years.Potted this little Dyckia ‘Naked Lady’ F2 into a rather large container this morning. It’s called ‘Naked Lady’ because it doesn’t have any spines along it’s leaf edges, which is uncommon for dyckia. 

This dyckia grows to be about one foot tall and wide so it should look nice once it matures. I also left this little native ground cover with it, in hopes that it will grow and spill out over the sides of the container and grow along the rock. 

Hope it makes it through the winter cause it’s not getting moved from that spot for years.Potted this little Dyckia ‘Naked Lady’ F2 into a rather large container this morning. It’s called ‘Naked Lady’ because it doesn’t have any spines along it’s leaf edges, which is uncommon for dyckia. 

This dyckia grows to be about one foot tall and wide so it should look nice once it matures. I also left this little native ground cover with it, in hopes that it will grow and spill out over the sides of the container and grow along the rock. 

Hope it makes it through the winter cause it’s not getting moved from that spot for years.

Potted this little Dyckia ‘Naked Lady’ F2 into a rather large container this morning. It’s called ‘Naked Lady’ because it doesn’t have any spines along it’s leaf edges, which is uncommon for dyckia.

This dyckia grows to be about one foot tall and wide so it should look nice once it matures. I also left this little native ground cover with it, in hopes that it will grow and spill out over the sides of the container and grow along the rock.

Hope it makes it through the winter cause it’s not getting moved from that spot for years.


Some tools I use quite often when getting plants ready for show; sale; or as for these four, an auction!

They’re for a “rare plant auction” and I don’t really have any rare plants, or at least can’t share the “rare” ones I have because they’re still young. 

So we have xQuesmea ‘Lyman’ in the first two pictures. Quesnelia ‘Farro’ in the second, xAndrolaechmea ‘Paradise’ in the third, and Orthophytum foliosum.Some tools I use quite often when getting plants ready for show; sale; or as for these four, an auction!

They’re for a “rare plant auction” and I don’t really have any rare plants, or at least can’t share the “rare” ones I have because they’re still young. 

So we have xQuesmea ‘Lyman’ in the first two pictures. Quesnelia ‘Farro’ in the second, xAndrolaechmea ‘Paradise’ in the third, and Orthophytum foliosum.Some tools I use quite often when getting plants ready for show; sale; or as for these four, an auction!

They’re for a “rare plant auction” and I don’t really have any rare plants, or at least can’t share the “rare” ones I have because they’re still young. 

So we have xQuesmea ‘Lyman’ in the first two pictures. Quesnelia ‘Farro’ in the second, xAndrolaechmea ‘Paradise’ in the third, and Orthophytum foliosum.Some tools I use quite often when getting plants ready for show; sale; or as for these four, an auction!

They’re for a “rare plant auction” and I don’t really have any rare plants, or at least can’t share the “rare” ones I have because they’re still young. 

So we have xQuesmea ‘Lyman’ in the first two pictures. Quesnelia ‘Farro’ in the second, xAndrolaechmea ‘Paradise’ in the third, and Orthophytum foliosum.Some tools I use quite often when getting plants ready for show; sale; or as for these four, an auction!

They’re for a “rare plant auction” and I don’t really have any rare plants, or at least can’t share the “rare” ones I have because they’re still young. 

So we have xQuesmea ‘Lyman’ in the first two pictures. Quesnelia ‘Farro’ in the second, xAndrolaechmea ‘Paradise’ in the third, and Orthophytum foliosum.Some tools I use quite often when getting plants ready for show; sale; or as for these four, an auction!

They’re for a “rare plant auction” and I don’t really have any rare plants, or at least can’t share the “rare” ones I have because they’re still young. 

So we have xQuesmea ‘Lyman’ in the first two pictures. Quesnelia ‘Farro’ in the second, xAndrolaechmea ‘Paradise’ in the third, and Orthophytum foliosum.

Some tools I use quite often when getting plants ready for show; sale; or as for these four, an auction!

They’re for a “rare plant auction” and I don’t really have any rare plants, or at least can’t share the “rare” ones I have because they’re still young.

So we have xQuesmea ‘Lyman’ in the first two pictures. Quesnelia ‘Farro’ in the second, xAndrolaechmea ‘Paradise’ in the third, and Orthophytum foliosum.


Detail of Neoregelia ‘DeRolf’. 
Sunburn and split leaves from falling acorns beat this plant to hell last fall, and it’s finally growing out of it this summer. 
This plant was on my wish list for so long before i found a pup for sale at a reasonable price!
It has great variegation that blushes pink in high light, and full grown plants are absolutely stunning, especially in flower.  View Larger

Detail of Neoregelia ‘DeRolf’. 

Sunburn and split leaves from falling acorns beat this plant to hell last fall, and it’s finally growing out of it this summer. 

This plant was on my wish list for so long before i found a pup for sale at a reasonable price!

It has great variegation that blushes pink in high light, and full grown plants are absolutely stunning, especially in flower. 


Scientific Name - Neoregelia ‘Marble Throat’Common Name - NonePlace of Origin - UnknownStatus - Not Threatened
This is a great small neo that I received about a year ago, since then it has put out a pup and is now flowering. Around six inches tall, it’s a small cultivar of Neoregelia chlorosticta with white flowers and interesting white “marbling” towards the center of the plant. In more sun it should get some pink coloring as well, but this one is under a Florida Sugar Maple and gets mostly shade, with only light sun in the morning and later in the day. It has fragrant flowers in spring. 
It made it through our last (mild) winter without any damage, so it’s relatively cold hardy. It’s also supposed to be very prolific, so I hope to have a large clump in no time. 
I recently bought another small clump of these, which are going to planted in the Rock Garden, where they might get a little more sun and hopefully some pink coloring.  View Larger

Scientific Name - Neoregelia ‘Marble Throat’
Common Name - None
Place of Origin - Unknown
Status - Not Threatened

This is a great small neo that I received about a year ago, since then it has put out a pup and is now flowering. Around six inches tall, it’s a small cultivar of Neoregelia chlorosticta with white flowers and interesting white “marbling” towards the center of the plant. In more sun it should get some pink coloring as well, but this one is under a Florida Sugar Maple and gets mostly shade, with only light sun in the morning and later in the day. It has fragrant flowers in spring. 

It made it through our last (mild) winter without any damage, so it’s relatively cold hardy. It’s also supposed to be very prolific, so I hope to have a large clump in no time. 

I recently bought another small clump of these, which are going to planted in the Rock Garden, where they might get a little more sun and hopefully some pink coloring. 


Scientific Name - Aechmea ‘Red Dragon’ Common Name - NonePlace of Origin - Unknown Status - Not threatened 
This is one of my favorite plants, and I think the pictures speak for themselves! However, I’m still going to talk a little bit about this plant. 
I couldn’t find much info on this plant, but it definitely has Aechmea recurvata in its blood, and is possibly a cultivar of A. recurvata or a hybrid. It has the typical recurvata shape, inflorescence, and blushing characteristic that many of them do. 
Very easy to care for, they take full to part sun, tolerate my cold weather with ease. They flower in early spring and stand out in the garden, despite their small size. An individual plant is around 6 to 8 inches tall, and maybe 4 to 6 inches wide when grown hard.  View Larger

Scientific Name - Aechmea ‘Red Dragon’ 
Common Name - None
Place of Origin - Unknown 
Status - Not threatened 

This is one of my favorite plants, and I think the pictures speak for themselves! However, I’m still going to talk a little bit about this plant. 

I couldn’t find much info on this plant, but it definitely has Aechmea recurvata in its blood, and is possibly a cultivar of A. recurvata or a hybrid. It has the typical recurvata shape, inflorescence, and blushing characteristic that many of them do. 

Very easy to care for, they take full to part sun, tolerate my cold weather with ease. They flower in early spring and stand out in the garden, despite their small size. An individual plant is around 6 to 8 inches tall, and maybe 4 to 6 inches wide when grown hard.