Bromeliaceae

Potted this little Dyckia ‘Naked Lady’ F2 into a rather large container this morning. It’s called ‘Naked Lady’ because it doesn’t have any spines along it’s leaf edges, which is uncommon for dyckia. 

This dyckia grows to be about one foot tall and wide so it should look nice once it matures. I also left this little native ground cover with it, in hopes that it will grow and spill out over the sides of the container and grow along the rock. 

Hope it makes it through the winter cause it’s not getting moved from that spot for years.Potted this little Dyckia ‘Naked Lady’ F2 into a rather large container this morning. It’s called ‘Naked Lady’ because it doesn’t have any spines along it’s leaf edges, which is uncommon for dyckia. 

This dyckia grows to be about one foot tall and wide so it should look nice once it matures. I also left this little native ground cover with it, in hopes that it will grow and spill out over the sides of the container and grow along the rock. 

Hope it makes it through the winter cause it’s not getting moved from that spot for years.Potted this little Dyckia ‘Naked Lady’ F2 into a rather large container this morning. It’s called ‘Naked Lady’ because it doesn’t have any spines along it’s leaf edges, which is uncommon for dyckia. 

This dyckia grows to be about one foot tall and wide so it should look nice once it matures. I also left this little native ground cover with it, in hopes that it will grow and spill out over the sides of the container and grow along the rock. 

Hope it makes it through the winter cause it’s not getting moved from that spot for years.Potted this little Dyckia ‘Naked Lady’ F2 into a rather large container this morning. It’s called ‘Naked Lady’ because it doesn’t have any spines along it’s leaf edges, which is uncommon for dyckia. 

This dyckia grows to be about one foot tall and wide so it should look nice once it matures. I also left this little native ground cover with it, in hopes that it will grow and spill out over the sides of the container and grow along the rock. 

Hope it makes it through the winter cause it’s not getting moved from that spot for years.Potted this little Dyckia ‘Naked Lady’ F2 into a rather large container this morning. It’s called ‘Naked Lady’ because it doesn’t have any spines along it’s leaf edges, which is uncommon for dyckia. 

This dyckia grows to be about one foot tall and wide so it should look nice once it matures. I also left this little native ground cover with it, in hopes that it will grow and spill out over the sides of the container and grow along the rock. 

Hope it makes it through the winter cause it’s not getting moved from that spot for years.

Potted this little Dyckia ‘Naked Lady’ F2 into a rather large container this morning. It’s called ‘Naked Lady’ because it doesn’t have any spines along it’s leaf edges, which is uncommon for dyckia.

This dyckia grows to be about one foot tall and wide so it should look nice once it matures. I also left this little native ground cover with it, in hopes that it will grow and spill out over the sides of the container and grow along the rock.

Hope it makes it through the winter cause it’s not getting moved from that spot for years.


Detail of Neoregelia ‘DeRolf’. 
Sunburn and split leaves from falling acorns beat this plant to hell last fall, and it’s finally growing out of it this summer. 
This plant was on my wish list for so long before i found a pup for sale at a reasonable price!
It has great variegation that blushes pink in high light, and full grown plants are absolutely stunning, especially in flower.  View Larger

Detail of Neoregelia ‘DeRolf’. 

Sunburn and split leaves from falling acorns beat this plant to hell last fall, and it’s finally growing out of it this summer. 

This plant was on my wish list for so long before i found a pup for sale at a reasonable price!

It has great variegation that blushes pink in high light, and full grown plants are absolutely stunning, especially in flower. 


Scientific Name - Quesnelia lateralisCommon Name - NonePlace of Origin - BrazilStatus - Not known
The genus quesnelia is one of my favorite genera in the bromeliad family, and with flowers like this it’s easy to see why. Many quesnelias have beautiful blue or purple colored flowers, paired with vivid colored bracts that range from yellow to hot pink. 
In my opinion, Quesnelia lateralis is one of the more interesting species, due to its interesting habit of flowering from the side, or laterally, giving it its specific name. If the plant only flowers laterally, it will survive and continue to grow, if it flowers from the center (terminally) it will die like other bromeliads, but will produce pups. Sometimes the plants will flower from the side and from the center at the same time. 
I’ve had this plant for a little over a year and this is the first time it’s flowered for me. I got it from a friend in California along with some other quesnelia’s that also flowered around the same time as this one. This plant is about 15 inches tall and slightly wider, with shiny green leaves that are banded with silver underneath. The leaves have small spines along the edges and a short terminal spine that isn’t too deadly, thankfully. It’s an easy to grow plant, I give mine full sun until about 12 PM and then it gets filtered shade the rest of the day, water it about once a week and it grows just fine. 
This one would probably look great mounted or in a hanging basket, especially when in flower. Hopefully it clumps well so I can have a nice flowering clump in a couple of years.  View Larger

Scientific Name - Quesnelia lateralis
Common Name - None
Place of Origin - Brazil
Status - Not known

The genus quesnelia is one of my favorite genera in the bromeliad family, and with flowers like this it’s easy to see why. Many quesnelias have beautiful blue or purple colored flowers, paired with vivid colored bracts that range from yellow to hot pink. 

In my opinion, Quesnelia lateralis is one of the more interesting species, due to its interesting habit of flowering from the side, or laterally, giving it its specific name. If the plant only flowers laterally, it will survive and continue to grow, if it flowers from the center (terminally) it will die like other bromeliads, but will produce pups. Sometimes the plants will flower from the side and from the center at the same time. 

I’ve had this plant for a little over a year and this is the first time it’s flowered for me. I got it from a friend in California along with some other quesnelia’s that also flowered around the same time as this one. This plant is about 15 inches tall and slightly wider, with shiny green leaves that are banded with silver underneath. The leaves have small spines along the edges and a short terminal spine that isn’t too deadly, thankfully. It’s an easy to grow plant, I give mine full sun until about 12 PM and then it gets filtered shade the rest of the day, water it about once a week and it grows just fine. 

This one would probably look great mounted or in a hanging basket, especially when in flower. Hopefully it clumps well so I can have a nice flowering clump in a couple of years.