Bromeliaceae

Scientific Name - Tillandsia tricolorCommon Name - Not availablePlace of Origin - Costa Rica, Mexico, Guatemala Status - Not knownThis is a really easy to grow tillandsia, and is relatively prolific as well. I bought it about 2 years ago, as a single flowering plant. It threw off three pups, which I assume are the three plants flowering now. The original mother plant is producing more pups, and the three plants flowering now are also producing lots of pups. Mine are grown in part shade and get watered almost every other day. They will color up more in more light. 
Each plant is about eight inches tall, with long, thin, dark green leaves that are silvery when young. The inflorescence’s extend well above the rosette, and are rather nice for such a plain plant. 
As you can see, the inflorescence is three colors, which is probably where this species gets its name. I think this species looks best in clumps, so I will leave the pups in place and see how it goes. Scientific Name - Tillandsia tricolorCommon Name - Not availablePlace of Origin - Costa Rica, Mexico, Guatemala Status - Not knownThis is a really easy to grow tillandsia, and is relatively prolific as well. I bought it about 2 years ago, as a single flowering plant. It threw off three pups, which I assume are the three plants flowering now. The original mother plant is producing more pups, and the three plants flowering now are also producing lots of pups. Mine are grown in part shade and get watered almost every other day. They will color up more in more light. 
Each plant is about eight inches tall, with long, thin, dark green leaves that are silvery when young. The inflorescence’s extend well above the rosette, and are rather nice for such a plain plant. 
As you can see, the inflorescence is three colors, which is probably where this species gets its name. I think this species looks best in clumps, so I will leave the pups in place and see how it goes. Scientific Name - Tillandsia tricolorCommon Name - Not availablePlace of Origin - Costa Rica, Mexico, Guatemala Status - Not knownThis is a really easy to grow tillandsia, and is relatively prolific as well. I bought it about 2 years ago, as a single flowering plant. It threw off three pups, which I assume are the three plants flowering now. The original mother plant is producing more pups, and the three plants flowering now are also producing lots of pups. Mine are grown in part shade and get watered almost every other day. They will color up more in more light. 
Each plant is about eight inches tall, with long, thin, dark green leaves that are silvery when young. The inflorescence’s extend well above the rosette, and are rather nice for such a plain plant. 
As you can see, the inflorescence is three colors, which is probably where this species gets its name. I think this species looks best in clumps, so I will leave the pups in place and see how it goes. Scientific Name - Tillandsia tricolorCommon Name - Not availablePlace of Origin - Costa Rica, Mexico, Guatemala Status - Not knownThis is a really easy to grow tillandsia, and is relatively prolific as well. I bought it about 2 years ago, as a single flowering plant. It threw off three pups, which I assume are the three plants flowering now. The original mother plant is producing more pups, and the three plants flowering now are also producing lots of pups. Mine are grown in part shade and get watered almost every other day. They will color up more in more light. 
Each plant is about eight inches tall, with long, thin, dark green leaves that are silvery when young. The inflorescence’s extend well above the rosette, and are rather nice for such a plain plant. 
As you can see, the inflorescence is three colors, which is probably where this species gets its name. I think this species looks best in clumps, so I will leave the pups in place and see how it goes. 

Scientific Name - Tillandsia tricolor
Common Name - Not available
Place of Origin - Costa Rica, Mexico, Guatemala
Status - Not known

This is a really easy to grow tillandsia, and is relatively prolific as well. I bought it about 2 years ago, as a single flowering plant. It threw off three pups, which I assume are the three plants flowering now. The original mother plant is producing more pups, and the three plants flowering now are also producing lots of pups. Mine are grown in part shade and get watered almost every other day. They will color up more in more light. 

Each plant is about eight inches tall, with long, thin, dark green leaves that are silvery when young. The inflorescence’s extend well above the rosette, and are rather nice for such a plain plant. 

As you can see, the inflorescence is three colors, which is probably where this species gets its name. I think this species looks best in clumps, so I will leave the pups in place and see how it goes. 



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