Bromeliaceae

Scientific Name - xQuesmea ’Flame’Common Name - Not availablePlace of Origin - Garden HybridStatus - Not threatened This is easily one of my favorite bromeliads. It’s a bigeneric cross between Quesnelia humilis and Aechmea recurvata, but the over all shape of the plant strongly favors its A. recurvata parent. The inflorescence, however, resembles its Q. humilis parent, but is more dense and shows better color. The plants leaves were tipped with pink year round, but as it started to come into flower, the pink color became more intense, and the hole plant also became flushed  with pink. Some of the color might also come from the higher light levels that come with spring. Since A. recurvata also flushes when it’s flowering, I feel that it is safe to say that most of it comes from this parent. The plant is about 8 inches tall, but for being so small, it sure is a stunner. It’s hard for me to choose a favorite bromeliad, but if I had to, this would be it.  Scientific Name - xQuesmea ’Flame’Common Name - Not availablePlace of Origin - Garden HybridStatus - Not threatened This is easily one of my favorite bromeliads. It’s a bigeneric cross between Quesnelia humilis and Aechmea recurvata, but the over all shape of the plant strongly favors its A. recurvata parent. The inflorescence, however, resembles its Q. humilis parent, but is more dense and shows better color. The plants leaves were tipped with pink year round, but as it started to come into flower, the pink color became more intense, and the hole plant also became flushed  with pink. Some of the color might also come from the higher light levels that come with spring. Since A. recurvata also flushes when it’s flowering, I feel that it is safe to say that most of it comes from this parent. The plant is about 8 inches tall, but for being so small, it sure is a stunner. It’s hard for me to choose a favorite bromeliad, but if I had to, this would be it.  Scientific Name - xQuesmea ’Flame’Common Name - Not availablePlace of Origin - Garden HybridStatus - Not threatened This is easily one of my favorite bromeliads. It’s a bigeneric cross between Quesnelia humilis and Aechmea recurvata, but the over all shape of the plant strongly favors its A. recurvata parent. The inflorescence, however, resembles its Q. humilis parent, but is more dense and shows better color. The plants leaves were tipped with pink year round, but as it started to come into flower, the pink color became more intense, and the hole plant also became flushed  with pink. Some of the color might also come from the higher light levels that come with spring. Since A. recurvata also flushes when it’s flowering, I feel that it is safe to say that most of it comes from this parent. The plant is about 8 inches tall, but for being so small, it sure is a stunner. It’s hard for me to choose a favorite bromeliad, but if I had to, this would be it.  

Scientific Name - xQuesmea ’Flame’
Common Name - Not available
Place of Origin - Garden Hybrid
Status - Not threatened

This is easily one of my favorite bromeliads. It’s a bigeneric cross between Quesnelia humilis and Aechmea recurvata, but the over all shape of the plant strongly favors its A. recurvata parent. The inflorescence, however, resembles its Q. humilis parent, but is more dense and shows better color. 

The plants leaves were tipped with pink year round, but as it started to come into flower, the pink color became more intense, and the hole plant also became flushed  with pink. Some of the color might also come from the higher light levels that come with spring. Since A. recurvata also flushes when it’s flowering, I feel that it is safe to say that most of it comes from this parent. 

The plant is about 8 inches tall, but for being so small, it sure is a stunner. It’s hard for me to choose a favorite bromeliad, but if I had to, this would be it.  



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